This one-off one part pilot uses the (at the time) new Enterprise crew from the Star Trek film.
Chekov and Dr McCoy are both absent since they were only released in their academy uniforms.
The creature they encounter on the time planet is the Nexu from Star Wars: Attack of the Clones.
The Federation listening post crewmen are also from Star Wars
Kirk
Spock
Sulu
Uhura
Scotty
Pike
Crewman Jackson - Star Wars Crimson Empire Carnor Jax
Crewman Tandy - Star Wars McQuarrie concept rebel soldier
Nexu

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The first new Star Trek movie didn’t sit well with me. Yes, it was a  good film and I can understand Star Trek being a global brand that the producers wanted to resurrect. But to reboot it and recast Kirk, Spock and the rest just smacks of laziness and lack of confidence in the Star Trek name alone.

That they have rebooted and thus undone a good forty odd years worth of continuity is bad enough. But they have to try and justify it by bringing back old Spock and rewrite history on screen. And it’s this bit that doesn’t sit well with me.

We have seen the crews of the various franchises traverse the bounds of time and space many times to put things right, whether it be Kirk and Spock ensuring the death of Edith Keeler, Sisko taking on the role of freedom fighter Gabriel Bell in the 21st Century, or Tasha Yar joining the crew of the Enterprise C to save the Narendra III colony. Our Star Trek heroes are not beyond taking tough decisions and will stop at nothing to put things right. But Spock in this movie, doesn’t. He knows how events should be playing out but does nothing to put it right.

I might have been happier if the toys had been better. They’re not bad. They’re in my favourite 3.75” scale (so plenty of Star Wars aliens for them to meet) and they’re well articulated. So, Kirk looks like a blow up doll? I can forgive that.

What I find it hard to forgive is the cavalier way we in the UK were treated, sold partially completed bridge and transporter playsets (which fortunately I didn’t buy) but denied the figure-pack-in furniture to complete them. Why? It makes absolutely no sense but comes across as a massive smack in the mouth from Playmates. Oh yeah, we’ll have your money but we don’t give a damn about you.

That and the fact that ultimately the figures bombed and didn’t even get a second wave meant that my proposed AFT series didn’t happen. That it reached the pilot stage, and that I filmed that pilot, is something of a miracle.

I toyed with a few ideas for a potential series but the main thing I wanted to do at the time was to address the time change. One of the things that drew me into Star Trek properly (back in 1991) was the coherent universe of technology and continuity that had been built up. There was a reference for almost everything and technical manuals to refer to. For this new timeline, there’s none of that. Not even a picture book of the new Enterprise so the first thing I had to do was sweep that aside and get the core characters back into a Trekiverse that I could create.

Although intended to be the start of a series, yes the Borg have swiped the Guardian of Forever in this timeline, this is a one off and will not be continued.

But that's not the end of Star Trek on the AFT, far from it. See below.

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The script is written very much as a pilot, setting up the premise of this crew pulled into another timeline but I was well aware that without the impetus of a continuing line of figures, there wouldn't be a series.
The script was written fairly quickly in 2009.

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The entire episode was shot pretty much in order in May 2009 starting with the Federation starbase. This small one wall set comprises a console, screen and elevator door. The name on the wall gives the place as Starbase 157.
The Enterprise bridge, shot next is just a backdrop of the new Enterprise.
Filming then moved to the Time Planet exteriors, a specially made backdrop with printed sand floor and foam filler rocks. The Guardian of Forever is a paper prop.
The last scenes to be shot were done in a small model I'd made of the classic Enterprise. The model comprised a bridge, transporter room and engineering. There was also a corridor and a crew room but these are not shown in the story.

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The story lay unfinished for years until May 2012 when I decided to finish it. It was edited on 23rd/ 24th May with lettering and some special effects shots added later.
The starbase is part of a galoob starbase model that was photographed for the Doctor Who story Crystal Palace.
Incidentally, one of the shots of the Federation crewmen was used in Doctor Who: Fear of the Daleks when I needed a cutaway shot.
The space scenes use pictures of the Enterprise model found on the internet. The image of the 'time planet' is based on the remastered version of City on the Edge of Forever.

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The story has been laying on my hard drive for nearly a year but now it's time to dust it off as we celebrate (hopefully) the new movie Star Trek: Into Darkness. To tie in with the film's release this story was posted on 23 April 2013.
It was to be called "Time's End" but instead I just decided to call it unofficially the pilot'.

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The Guardian of Forever is from the classic Star Trek episode City on the Edge of Forever
The stardate I've used in the story seems to tie in with the film's dating but I have no recollection where I got it from. If it's inaccurate, it's probably a placemarker that I've forgotten to update.
The USS Belaqua takes its name from Lyra Belaqua, the protagonist in Philip Pullman's alternate reality spanning His Dark Materials trilogy.

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As I said, this isn't the end of Star Trek on the AFT. So Hasbro may not be giving us a new line of figures to tie in with the new movie but there's always the brilliant Playmates figures.